Wednesday, 01 June 2016
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It is hard to find out what it means Can I get example pictures?
5 years ago
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#29497
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This might give you an example. Dark top, dark back wood, contrasting maple layer in this case. [attachment=0:3k61purx]4627b.jpg[/attachment:3k61purx]
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5 years ago
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#29498
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woh~ Thanx a lot bro.
5 years ago
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#29499
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Thanks Nah. I'll add that the contrast layer can be either flame maple or wenge depending on if a light or dark wood will provide the most contrast.
5 years ago
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#29501
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Wenge example: [attachment=1:1rtm1x9l]WengeContrast.JPG[/attachment:1rtm1x9l] Double layer example: [attachment=0:1rtm1x9l]DoubleContrast.JPG[/attachment:1rtm1x9l]
5 years ago
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#29519
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is there any impact on tone/sound based on the contrast layers? (ie some say a bass with a top has more compressed sound than 1 with out a top?) if so - what would be the characteristics of maple vs wenge as a layer? thanks jf
5 years ago
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#29522
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I might agree that a top changes the tone (enough to hear anyway) if it was thick and a significantly different density than the core but our tops are so thin, we've never been able to hear a difference.
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