Saturday, 19 December 2009
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I'm putting this under basses, though it might be so far off it needs to go in Off Topic. Anybody playing DB in their projects? I've been bit by the DB bug and I'm currently looking into the matter. Any help or advice would be most welcome. Including advice to forget it and move on! We do enough roots and rockabilly type stuff for it to maybe make sense. I'm looking at a used Slap King with guts and a K & K pu/pre. Is it a :idea: bright idea? Or is it big trouble?
11 years ago
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#15354
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I play a '47 Kay M1 at home, a full-size upright. It's a great workout. :) You can't really go wrong unless you just buy the cheapest DB bass out there. I've heard the Slap Kings are OK. Go for it. Mark
11 years ago
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#15358
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Hunt around for an American Standard if you can find one. Great for big band and rockabilly, etc. They project very well with a good setup and decent strings.
11 years ago
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#15396
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I play double bass primarily--started on electric bass, now the upright is my real love. It's a really hard instrument to play well. Hard to play in tune, hard to get a good acoustic tone, hard to get a good amplified sound, physically tiring, hard to lug around. Even so, I love it. The techniques are all totally different--you can fake it, sort of, but I HIGHLY recommend a few lessons with an experienced player, just to get the mechanics down. Also get a quality ply bass--the really cheap ones will just start falling apart and will never be playable for long. Good brands from China are Shen and Christopher--they both make good play models. Upton bass is a great shop to deal with and they make a really good entry level bass. In my experience, you want to buy the bass from a luthier, someone who makes and repairs double basses for a living. It's really fun--work but fun. There's nothing like the feeling of walking a bass line on the upright.
11 years ago
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#15416
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I don't own a double bass, but my little brother plays for the youth orchestra in this city and he has one on loan from them. I don't know much about it, but I did learn to play it and I do pick it up now and again and play around with it. I love the sound they make and I think anyone who really enjoys playing electric owes it to themselves to try and pick DB up too.
11 years ago
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#15419
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As you know they are physically very different to play. They also give new meaning to 'load in and 'load out.' I found a used '70's Czech ply 3/4 bass and it has been very durable and projects well. I think every electric bass player should at least know how to get around on an upright, because the day may come when you are asked to play one for a tune or two or asked to sub in for someone...
11 years ago
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#15545
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My new years resolution was to get some lessons going and learn some fresh stuff: work on my reading, get into jazz, and get going on the DB. Oh, yeah, and lay off the talkbass and screen sucking. Less Talk (bass) More Practice! and no more GAS inducing shopping! So far, so good... a little bass forum back sliding, but mostly things are going well. I've been lucky to find a loaner bass, '40 Kay C-1. It is very playable, but in need of some fingerboard work. I'll pony up for that in return for the use of the bass. Meanwhile, I'll keep looking and checking out the options for strings and sounds. Anybody out there playing guts for rockabilly slap style? There's a lot to learn, and these basses and strings can make a dent in the wallet. So, no need to rush into a purchase. I also lined up some lessons to go with the new endeavor. Once the fingerboard work is done next week, the new set up should be a good bit lower and easier to play. (This old bass has some pretty deep grooves in key spots on the fingerboard, the action is pretty high to keep the buzzing down.) It's quite a work out, but it sure is fun. It has a pup so I can run it through my DTR-1 tuner to help me be accurate with intonation. It has already done wonders for my ear. The DB has been like starting a weight training program, its really hard at first, but the improvements come pretty quickly. Last thing: the DB side of talk bass seems to be much more civilized and useful. Just be careful with spelling and punctuation! :roll: :roll:
11 years ago
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#15560
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I started on EB and within two years DB was my primary instrument. Even though I was primarily focused on Jazz it was quickly made known to me that becoming friendly with a bow was the best (some said the [b:a7cavvpn]only[/b:a7cavvpn])way to dial-in proper hand position/intonation. This didn't make much sense to me until I started doing it. It's amazing how much easier it is to hear the notes when they're bowed, the upper mid frequencies just aren't there for a significant amount of time when plucking, it's night and day. As far as a bass is concerned, I would trade off good stability and playability for natural sound quality since you'll be amping it. The market is riddled with basses that require constant work to even stay in one piece, let alone stay playable. The DB section of TB is actually a really good resource, not much of the BS and long-pissing that you sometimes find in the BG section. Good Luck!!
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