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  Friday, 14 August 2009
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I have engineered sessioins like thus
12 years ago
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#13751
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HAHAHAHA!!! I can imagine the look on their faces. Paul, how long have you been an engineer? And what are a handfull of the bands you've recorded? Anyone big, or one we'd recognize? I'm very curious about recording, my band bought Pro Tools a few months back and we've started to play around with that before we go into a real studio.
12 years ago
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#13754
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[quote="Tyler":3dzbg0pw]HAHAHAHA!!! I can imagine the look on their faces. Paul, how long have you been an engineer? And what are a handfull of the bands you've recorded? Anyone big, or one we'd recognize? I'm very curious about recording, my band bought Pro Tools a few months back and we've started to play around with that before we go into a real studio.[/quote:3dzbg0pw] Aside from the obvious (the band not sucking), having some sort of working knowledge of the recording process and knowing how to work with and stay out of the way of the engineer is probably the best thing a young band can have going for them the first time they go into the studio. Not to mention the way a band tends to have their junk together if they've recorded the song before and know what they want to do format wise and the resulting lack of "man, that solo really doesn't fit there" moments. Good for you guys for being proactive and wanting to have your wits about you when you get there!
12 years ago
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#13755
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Thanks alot davio. We heard way to many records of our friends and they would always say "it still doesn't sound as good as we'd like it to, but we ran out of money". So I did alot of research on pre-production. Now we'll know exactly what we want and how we want it to sound when we get there. We can make the changes of "now that I hear it recorded, that doesn't work" at home without wasting precious studio time/big money. And its fun just to play around with, record with different style mics in different rooms, being experimental, not just in writing, is one of the best ways to find an original sound, I think.
12 years ago
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#13756
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[quote="Tyler":3bfmoqo3]HAHAHAHA!!! I can imagine the look on their faces. Paul, how long have you been an engineer? And what are a handfull of the bands you've recorded? Anyone big, or one we'd recognize? I'm very curious about recording, my band bought Pro Tools a few months back and we've started to play around with that before we go into a real studio.[/quote:3bfmoqo3] I will apologize in advance for the lengthy response. I guess I get carried away sometimes, but here goes... I am an engineer (but have been called worse) and I've been doing it for over 25 years, but in some circles I tend to keep it under wraps. . It's doubful you would recognize bands/projects that I have contributed to as as a recording engineer as it is mosly mid-level stuff, singer songwriter projects, new bands, and obscure jazz and R & B guys. You may know some of the people I have have toured with though. I have had the good fortune to have done Tower of Power, Sergio Mendez, Rick James, and Edgar Winter to drop a few legendary names, I've also been out with Natalie Cole, Player, Michael Hakes, WCR and a few others. I have also mixed Paul Jackson Jr. The Crusaders, Smokey Robinson, the Beach Boys, The Temptations, a lot of bands doing jazz, blues and rock festivals and the usual club and corporate stuff. Hopefully no one will take the above as boasting or bragging. It's all (moslty) been a privelege to do the work. It's good you are getting your feet wet at home before going into a comercial studio. You'll have a better idea of what's going on and by getting your ideas down "at home" you can find out what works, what doesn't, hone your songwriting skills etc. It also helps you not to be afraid to throw away ideas, parts, and even entire tracks that aren't working. But the beauty of digital is that you are able to store everything, edit, then keep the rest on file, or trash it. Me? I ultimately found out, that putting money into a studio owners pocket, didn't work for me. So I took that money and bought the gear (lots and lots and lots of gear) to compose, record and mix with. Then (as long as what one has is tracked well and doesn't sound like poop) the project can be taken into a "real" studio to mix and master. I found by doing it that way, you have the equipment to call your own, and can keep learning about the writing, arranging, prodution, recording, editing, and mixing processes. There, more than enough said.
12 years ago
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#13757
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[quote="Tyler":h8m1cqji]And its fun just to play around with, record with different style mics in different rooms, being experimental, not just in writing, is one of the best ways to find an original sound, I think.[/quote:h8m1cqji] This is true, however an original sound that really works usually either costs $$$ or is a combination of brilliance and a healthy portion of luck. If you're on a budget, don't expect an awesome original sound...just be elated if you happen to achieve it and consider yourself lucky if it goes the other way and isn't a train wreck (much more likely). If you go into an established studio with an experienced pro engineer, talk to him/her ahead of time to communicate what you're hoping to get out of the experience and don't be surprised if/when they seem to already have tried and true ways of achieving said goals. People have been experimenting with revolutionary methods of recording for many decades and while I can't say that it's all been done in the past, I can say that whatever you're trying has more than likely been done and either incorporated into a fairly standard practice or exploited until it was found either impractical or that there was a better way to achieve the desired effect. I don't want to sound like a buzz kill but almost all pro engineers I've worked with fit into two categories: either they'll let you do whatever you want and smile to themselves as they watch the hours tick by and their paycheck swell or they're concerned about efficiency and care about the product they'll be putting their name on so they want to do what they know will work to give the desired result in as little time as possible.
12 years ago
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#13758
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Paul - Thats really amazing you got to work with such artists. And I don't see it as bragging, I asked about your career so you told me. No harm done. Thats impressive you can do all of that work on your own and not have to deal with the studio. But at the same time, I think I would enjoy working with different engineers and producers for ideas, instead of the same 3 bums I play with already :P davio - Don't worry, you're not a buzz kill. We would only do that stuff on our own just for fun anyway, and I would usually always want an engineer to be up front and tell us there's a better, faster, cheaper way. And as it is right now, we don't have alot of money so we will be on a budget. We won't be doing anything that increases our recording bill anytime soon.
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