Monday, 17 January 2011
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I've experienced our basses live, I've heard lots of feedback from audience members - not just bass afficionados. I've had players tell me that they get more gigs now that they play a Dingwall. I'm convinced that the bass can play an important role in motivating people to come out from behind their gaming and home theater systems to see live music. I'd like to hear if anyone else sees a correlation between the clarity and audience response. Do you get a sense that your musical ideas and especially groove are more effectively communicated to your audience with a Dingwall bass? If so, how would you describe it? I'm preparing a video on our view of tone. I'd like to use a few of these comments.
11 years ago
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#19105
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It's not uncommon for audience members to approach me on break to comment on the tone of my Dingwalls. The comments are always positive. At my last gig, a fellow told me that my Dingwall Voodoo bass sounded like bass notes played on a grand piano, especially on songs I played with a pick. Huge, piano-like tone! That's the inherent quality of tone that the fanned-fret design imparts to a Dingwall bass. It has the best B-string in the business! I love my Dingwalls, and so does the crowd. Mark
11 years ago
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#19108
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I got a few compliments on my tone/playing by non musicians after shows. What makes that special is that I play in a punk-metal band with two very loud highly distorted guitars, and I never got compliments with my previous basses; with my Dingwall, the audience can finally clearly hear and understand what I play through that wall of distortion.
11 years ago
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#19110
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The sound guys [i:1r8y7zz7]always[/i:1r8y7zz7] gush. So do other bass players. Again, always. Lay people seldom comment on the tone specifically. But I don't think lay people listen to the components of music they're hearing. What I have noticed since getting my Dingwall is that my bands are getting more gigs, I'm getting more gigs, and people like my bands more. Now, I was just starting a new band when I got my Dingwall, and it could be that the band is better than previous ones (it definitely is). Another new project in the last year is with stellar folks in a great situation. But I absolutely know that the Dingwall has made me a better bass player in several specific ways, and that my being better has led to increased success (getting gigs and being liked) for my bands. First and foremost, I love playing the bass. It's beautiful and it's easier to play that previous axes. If you like playing, you play more and you get better. Simple formula. But the sound has a lot to do with it, too. And here, I don't mean that it has a magic tone I've been looking for all my life. Not at all. It's about clarity and responsiveness. Because the bass is so clear, I hear what I'm doing much better than on any other bass, and that means I know if I'm where I want to be with every nuance. If not, I work harder. And by responsiveness, I mean that the bass gives me back, in tone, what I do to it with my fingers (or, occasionally, with a pick). Precisely. This is both demanding--make a mistake and you and everybody else hears it--and inspiring because the universe of bass possibility just got so much broader and deeper.
11 years ago
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#19111
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I would have to say that it does make a difference. The first day I got my bass and played at practice with my jazz combo, some non-musician friends who were there were blown away by the sound and couldn't stop saying how good the bass sounded this time. Also, after the 1st show with my ABZ many people approached to compliment my sound, saying that the notes were really clear and they could hear what I was doing this time, even the notes played on the B string. I believe it has something to do with how full each note sounds. Thanks for making amazing instruments Sheldon, Ivan
11 years ago
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#19116
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Thanks guys that kind of where I was headed with this. If you can hear yourself better you can play tighter. If the groove is tighter and can be heard (communicated) by the audience better. They will have a better experience which should translate to increased audiences, more gigs etc.
11 years ago
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#19117
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When I got my first Dingwall, an Afterburner II 5, the band I was playing with at the time was jamming with electronic drums, two guitars, keyboards and vocals through a crude headphone setup. It was always difficult to hear myself though the stack of sound and I found myself trying a lot of different things to get heard while not boosting the volume and bass such to overpower everyone else. My Dingwall solved that problem. I could hear myself clearly all the way down to low B and then the concentration turned from getting heard to my [i:1chmt17p]actual[/i:1chmt17p] playing.
11 years ago
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#19118
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Now I feel the need to express my feelings about my "Dingwall experience" Up until the day I first laid my hands on a Dingwall ABZ 5, I was a shameless MusicMan afficionado, close to a fanboi, close, but not quite. Still, being mostly a 5 strings bassist, I thought up to that time that there was no better neck than a Stingray 5 or Bongo 5, a Big Al 5, 25th Anniversary 5 etc etc, you name it I've owned the lot of them. I truly found those to be the best size neck for a five strings with the best action around and a very decently pronounced low B. Then one day, I went to a shop to try a floor pedal effect and they had this sexy ABZ 5 in a natural colour that was calling me... Pick me up, Pick me up!! Soon as I did pick it up and tried it, I felt like I had jumped 5 feet up in the air in admiration and surprise, oh man that neck, the action and the accuracy of pitch thorught the neck. And then there's that [b:xbagwd7e][size=150:xbagwd7e][color=#FFBF40:xbagwd7e]LOW B[/color:xbagwd7e][/size:xbagwd7e][/b:xbagwd7e], case closed. Nothing in the world comes close to that one! Never before I had tried such killer bass. There was no doubt in my mind that I needed that bass. I paid the man there and then and took it home. What happend after my purchase was that no other 5 strings bass I owned (except for the 4 strings Fenderites J & P's which I keep) could match up to the feel, quality and response of this ABZ 5, the most important thing is that I could now play faster runs, more accurately and it has truly made me a better player. What is in my head now comes out of my finger faster and better. Before the ABZ 5 what was in my head was not as easy to perform on my other 5 strings EBMM basses so... I had to offload all of them. My ABZ 5 it has become my main instrument both live and in practice room it outperfoms all my expectations. I have gone from six 5 string basses to just one, until my Super J arrives this is all I need. Of course my band mates have all noticed a great improvement and they went from calling it the "funny fret bass" to the "Super Bass" Random peole have complemented me not only because of the sound but more importantly to the harmonic structure of my bass lines which now make sense to the unsuspecting where before some people though of it as mindless noodling. That in itself is my greatests reward. Do I regret having sold such rare breed bass as a MusicMan 25th Anniversary HSS bass? The answer is hell no. All I can say is I look forward to the next, (Super J P/J) and which ever next after that, I think I want to try one of those 3 pickups what Lee Sklar plays. Thanks Sheldon for such an innovative and inspiring instrument.
11 years ago
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#19119
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I believe my Dingwall bass plays an important roll in crowd response in a couple of different ways. The first being the tone! Since I've switched to playing the Dingwall, my tone has been clarified and the even tension on the strings actually helps me play better—especially on the B-string. This not only makes me personally sound better, but makes my band overall sound better. All of my other gear now is for cultivating this clarity of tone the Dingwall produces. Second would be the interaction the bass prompts from people who see and hear it. I inevitably have someone come up to me and ask about the bass after every show. Whether it be about the sound of the bass, the fanned-frets, or the shear beauty of the instrument. It's great to have that extra 'thing' to attract people to what my band and I are doing musically!
11 years ago
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#19121
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I do get folks that say that they really like the sound(tone) of my Prima Artist. In the past I have played several other basses and never got any comments so I attribute it to my Dingwall. It is certainly not my playing expertise as that is a work in progress. I don't go through the house as it is just to much for our church setting so I just play through a 4x10 and keep the volume pretty low. It seems to work well. It does make it harder for me to get the volume just right but the bass sounds so wonderful that it really doesn't matter as long as I don't drown out the rest of the band.
11 years ago
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#19125
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This is a cool thread! Makes me look forward to my Dingwall! And makes me dread the coming 3 months of no gigs/rehearsals cause our singer is in the States for work.
11 years ago
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#19135
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[quote:2r3hp3hh]The sound guys always gush. So do other bass players. Again, always. Lay people seldom comment on the tone specifically. [/quote:2r3hp3hh] +1. Most of the non-musicians in the audience don't even notice the bass player. I've lost count how many times I'm playing something really nice and look at the audience and see everyone staring in awe ... at the guitarist! Jeez, we get no respect. But the sound guys and the bassists in the audience know. But I know that my sound is so much better than when I play my other basses, and I'm positive that this contributes to all those general "you guys sound great" comments. Of course they're all drunk so what do they know. :D
11 years ago
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#19137
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I've not said anything here because I'm not quite sure how to answer. I've been using Sheldon's basses since 2005, and I certainly BELIEVE that they make a difference live (or I wouldn't play one), but its hard to tell, because I'm not in the room when the band is playing. I do feel that I get more compliments on my bass being clear and clean and authoritative, no matter if its a small room or a gymnasium. I also know that seldom do I play and not have someone in the crowd come up and compliment my sound, my playing, etc. Is that the bass? or other factors? I don't know. I do enjoy the silly grin that my singer gets when I start playing LOW. I don't remember that happening previously. The nice thing about Dingwall basses is that as someone who uses a lot of lows in my sound and pulls off a lot of the higher frequencies, I don't lose definition and presence on stage or out front. I don't muddy up the mix like I have with some previous basses (my precision, my PRS, even a Jazz can give you undefined low wash).
11 years ago
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#19158
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While on tour in Ecuador, I had a professional guitar player (in the audience) comment "wow, that bass really sounds awesome, the low end is incredible." This was with my Dingwall AB-II 5-string. On a few songs I would hit the detuner on the low B and play a low A. Thunder.
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