Tuesday, 09 March 2010
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I've been wanting to get a Dingwall for a long time, and I'm finally in a position where I might possibly be able to get a used AB1 or a Combustion. I've found a 2003 AB1 for sale for $1200. From the photos the seller sent me, it appears to be in good shape with one or two very small dings. The Dingwall "signature" on the headstock is also partially worn off. I've also found a 11/2009 Combustion for $1000. I've never played a Dingwall, and there aren't any near me to be able to try before I buy. I'm looking for tips on the differences between these two as well as any insight as to whether either of these are clearly a better deal than the other. I'm inclined to lean toward the AB1, but any thoughts would be appreciated. Thanks.
11 years ago
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#15980
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Also, I've seen some AB1 basses that have the three knobs and some that have the knobs plus what appears to be a switch near the bridge pickup. What's the switch for? What other differences are there between the two aside from the switch?
11 years ago
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#15981
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Earlier AB-Is have both pickups wired in parallel. Those ABs have a special circuit called BluEQube that could be turned on/off with that switch. I'm not sure what it was supposed to be doing, but it's some EQ. Later ABs have the bridge pickup wired in series while the neck pup is wired in parallel - and it's a great thing. It made the BluEQube somewhat redundant and it was removed. No current models feature a BluEQube as far as I know. Personally, I like both my pups in series mode individually. Combustions have the bridge pup in series stock, neck in parallel. In case you don't know, pickups in series have more low mids and stronger output, while parallel pups are somewhat mid-scooped. So a series bridge pickup produces a nice mid-oriented sound that nicely complements the neck pickup, while producing equal output because there's less string movement near the bridge. Series/parallel modes don't change whether pickups are humbucking. I can't help you with listing the differences between the two models, but I understand they're quite different beasts, i.e. owning them both might not be redundant. Oh, and welcome to the forum!
11 years ago
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#15982
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Also, AB1 is passive whilst Combustion is active, if that's a consideration.
11 years ago
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#15983
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Thats not the one for sale in Oregon, is it?
11 years ago
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#15984
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I'd go for the ABI. Both basses are not in the same class. - The ABI with FD-3 pickups are very hot, louder than most, if not all, of my active basses - The ABI will be lighter - The ABI has a slimmer neck and balances better (although, the Combustion balances well too) - The ABI, in my opinion, has a clearer and a more cutting sound - The ABI is more responsive (you'll need some good muting technique to keep the sympathetic ring down) It probably sounds like I don't like the Combustion, which I do, but for the $200 difference, I would go for the Afterburner hands down, especially at that price.
11 years ago
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#15985
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Thanks to everyone for the feedback. Sounds like AB1 is where I need to focus since I am partial to passive basses, and the AB1 also seems to be a little higher on the food chain. :)
11 years ago
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#15986
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[quote="Bocete":ls92jk0d]Earlier AB-Is have both pickups wired in parallel. Those ABs have a special circuit called BluEQube that could be turned on/off with that switch. I'm not sure what it was supposed to be doing, but it's some EQ. [/quote:ls92jk0d] It was/is a mid-cut switch. Mark
11 years ago
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#15987
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[quote="DaveC":f3a4rsxr]Thanks to everyone for the feedback. Sounds like AB1 is where I need to focus since I am partial to passive basses, and the AB1 also seems to be a little higher on the food chain. :)[/quote:f3a4rsxr] Get the Afterburner. You won't regret it. Mark
11 years ago
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#15991
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[quote="guitarded":3j7mcvj2][quote="Bocete":3j7mcvj2]Earlier AB-Is have both pickups wired in parallel. Those ABs have a special circuit called BluEQube that could be turned on/off with that switch. I'm not sure what it was supposed to be doing, but it's some EQ. [/quote:3j7mcvj2] It was/is a mid-cut switch. Mark[/quote:3j7mcvj2] That's what I thought, but I wasn't sure because, well, how did the series bridge pickup make a mid-cut switch obsolete? That pickup change only brought more mids to the overall sound.
11 years ago
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#15992
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[quote="Bocete":2wbloml6][quote="guitarded":2wbloml6][quote="Bocete":2wbloml6]Earlier AB-Is have both pickups wired in parallel. Those ABs have a special circuit called BluEQube that could be turned on/off with that switch. I'm not sure what it was supposed to be doing, but it's some EQ. [/quote:2wbloml6] It was/is a mid-cut switch. Mark[/quote:2wbloml6] That's what I thought, but I wasn't sure because, well, how did the series bridge pickup make a mid-cut switch obsolete? That pickup change only brought more mids to the overall sound.[/quote:2wbloml6] The parallel combination of the neck parallel/bridge series sounded very similar to the parallel combination of neck in parallel/bridge parallel/bluEQube. Some players loved the bluEQube, a lot didn't understand it. In the end, the series bridge added cost at our end that would have meant raising the price or cutting the bluEQube. The original philosophy of the Afterburner was keep it simple but effective and keep the cost down. So we cut the bluEQube.
11 years ago
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#15993
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Thanks :)
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