1. Mark L
  2. Ask Sheldon
  3. Tuesday, 29 January 2013
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This may have been asked before, but have you ever considered applying this to your basses? Any thoughts on the subject in general, or as it applies to Dingwalls?
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Sheldon Dingwall Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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We are still mostly cutting fret slots with a saw blade making that system impossible. As we move necks over to the new CNC we will be routing the slots so anything would be possible - time allowing. At this point in the life of the Dingwall business, the needs of the company require me to spend as little time as possible tinkering and as much time as possible managing things.
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BuffaloBob Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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[quote="Sheldon Dingwall":3ojrfwfr]We are still mostly cutting fret slots with a saw blade making that system impossible. As we move necks over to the new CNC we will be routing the slots so anything would be possible - time allowing. At this point in the life of the Dingwall business, the needs of the company require me to spend as little time as possible tinkering and as much time as possible managing things.[/quote:3ojrfwfr]
With success in business comes trade-offs. A good problem to have for sure!
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Mats Eriksson Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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I'll chime in. I don't think it would provide anything noticeable difference at all. They have the TT system made for bass, and no one buys it. Because:

1) If you need that precise intonation, bass players goes fretless.
2) The intonation problem at the nut and first fret disappears with fanned frets
3) No one I know plays "closed chord voicings" down there anyway, on any bass.
4) the guitar has - all of a sudden - PLAIN strings too, to worry about, and they are flexing in a different way that wound ones. And granted, look at any TT system the most "yanking" of the frets appears between spun fourth and plain 3rd strings.

You won't hear the benefits of flattened or sharpened thirds, with the TrueTemperament anyway on a bass. On a regular guitar I can very well see SOME benefits, but on bass, I have yet to think of any situation where those TT frets would be useful. Even less so if a fanned fret design should go on top of that.Talk about "gilding the lily" or whatever the catchphrase is! TT's it's like you're yanking one note at a certain fret a few cents flat/sharp here and there, due to the inharmonic of the string which is - by default - too short for its given gauge, pitch, and length. And Fanned Frets already bucks that by it's nature.
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