Friday, 29 January 2010
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I dont know if this is the best forum but I am looking for any advise on the neck profile. All my basses have a rounder profile where the Super J is "flatter". When I play the super J after about 45 minutes I get a lot of thumb pain. Everything else about this bass is perfect and I want to make it my main bass but am worried about the pain. Can anyone tell me if it is just a case of getting used to it? I know Shelden knows what he is doing and there must be a reason. Everyone has a preferance too though I know. Thanks in advance, WB
11 years ago
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#15646
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[quote="Wannabass":33v04wiw]I dont know if this is the best forum but I am looking for any advise on the neck profile. All my basses have a rounder profile where the Super J is "flatter". When I play the super J after about 45 minutes I get a lot of thumb pain. Everything else about this bass is perfect and I want to make it my main bass but am worried about the pain. Can anyone tell me if it is just a case of getting used to it? I know Shelden knows what he is doing and there must be a reason. Everyone has a preferance too though I know. Thanks in advance, WB[/quote:33v04wiw] What other basses are you used to playing? Is your SuperJ a 4 or 5? The neck on a SJ 4 is tiny, but not much different from a regular Jazz bass profile, not enough to cause pain, IMO. Where does the thumb start to hurt? My Dingwalls have never hurt me, but other forum members have mentioned problems with wrist or arm pain in the past. Maybe they will be able to help. Good luck. Mark
11 years ago
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#15647
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My guess is that it's personal preference. While I don't have outright pain, I find it a little more uncomfortable to play my basses that have a rounder neck profile.
11 years ago
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#15649
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[quote="Smallmouth_Bass":134r1jzn]My guess is that it's personal preference. While I don't have outright pain, I find it a little more uncomfortable to play my basses that have a rounder neck profile.[/quote:134r1jzn] +1. A night playing on my Fender P bass is physically harder than a night playing one of my Dingwalls. Mark
11 years ago
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#15650
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So far my 94 TRB 4 string has the easiest profile with about a 1.625 nut. Much rounder than my Super J 4 string. My 88 jazz reissue, JSNB, G bass, couple oder Ibanez even my Earthwood has a rounder profile. Sheldon suggested shimming my thumb with a glove end that I am going to try this weekend but it may just be a matter of getting used to it. The pain is mostly in the meat part of the thumb at the hand. I never thought such a small difference would matter but the mussels seem to know.. Thanks for your input, WB
11 years ago
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#15651
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Out of curiosity, do you use a contemporary or traditional grip on your left hand? I usually use a traditional type hand position myself and find I get a similar pain to what you're describing. Mine is more of a soreness, and I attributed it to irregular playing/practicing. It happens on both my MTD and my Combustion. Maybe it's time for me to look into alternate hand positions and playing styles.
11 years ago
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#15652
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[quote="TheGrandEnigma":2sjhvabk]Maybe it's time for me to look into alternate hand positions and playing styles.[/quote:2sjhvabk] This. Like the old joke: "Doctor, it hurts when I do this." "Then stop doing it."
11 years ago
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#15653
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Maybe it's time for me to look into alternate hand positions and playing styles.[/quote] This is what I was thinking. Not to ask a dumb question I don't know the difference between styles? Please dont even joke about not playing the Dingwall anymore, I will build up the neck with JB weld if I have to!
11 years ago
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#15654
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Not a dumb question at all. I learned it from a website. :oops: Traditional is playing with your thumb pad resting on the neck pointed at the headstock. Contemporary is your typical guitar grip with your thumb across the neck pointed at your head. (I'll take pictures later.) I find the contemporary to be more comfortable, but the traditional to let me reach around better. Not sure if these are industry standard names/grips, but hat's what I call them. :roll: There are professional (chiropractors? is that right?) that deal specifically with musicians to help with this. I believe there's a good one here in Saskatoon, but I'm not sure.
11 years ago
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#15655
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[quote="TheGrandEnigma":1td27qwl]There are professional (chiropractors? is that right?) that deal specifically with musicians to help with this. I believe there's a good one here in Saskatoon, but I'm not sure.[/quote:1td27qwl] Chiropractors are for backs. I believe you're thinking of occupational therapists.
11 years ago
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#15656
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[quote="davio":17g0lfjr][quote="TheGrandEnigma":17g0lfjr]There are professional (chiropractors? is that right?) that deal specifically with musicians to help with this. I believe there's a good one here in Saskatoon, but I'm not sure.[/quote:17g0lfjr] Chiropractors are for backs. I believe you're thinking of occupational therapists.[/quote:17g0lfjr] Or physical therapists. OT's and PT's can both specialize in hands. A chiropractor will likely not. I'm a PT. I'll give you some free advice, Wannabass. When we have pain, in the absence of pathology, it is nearly always postural strain and/or repetitive stress injury. Where exactly do you feel the pain in your thumb? You really should have to be at the bass for hours a day to experience repetitive strain injury - 45 minutes at a time wouldn't likely cause it. It sounds more like fatigue/postural strain of some sort. Typically, a flatter neck should be less fatiguing than a fatter one, but that doesn't help you now. I would experiment with raising or lowering the strap, which ever direction is less strain on your wrist and hand. Good luck. Mark
11 years ago
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#15657
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[quote="Wannabass":1puytmdi]Please dont even joke about not playing the Dingwall anymore, I will build up the neck with JB weld if I have to![/quote:1puytmdi] Well, you could have Sheldon build you a chunkier neck. It won't be cheap, but you knew that already. :P Mark
11 years ago
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#15658
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My guess would be that you're doing something differently, above and beyond having to have your thumb closer to your fingers because of the shallower profile. If you're sore down at the muscle between the wrist and thumb(down at the base, or ball of the thumb) then you're probably not keeping your hand, or grip relaxed.
11 years ago
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#15659
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[quote="davio":fs0j2455][quote="TheGrandEnigma":fs0j2455]There are professional (chiropractors? is that right?) that deal specifically with musicians to help with this. I believe there's a good one here in Saskatoon, but I'm not sure.[/quote:fs0j2455] Chiropractors are for backs. I believe you're thinking of occupational therapists.[/quote:fs0j2455] Yep that's the one. Good thing you guys piped up, I (obviously) don't really know much about this. :s
11 years ago
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#15660
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Someone told me its a physiotherapist and someone out there is one.. I just played the Super J a bit after playing a couple others for a while, getting warmed up and I could feel a bit of pain in the thumb crotch...is there such a thing? After measuring all the nuts and string spacing the Super J is even closer spaced than my Fender Jazz and Ibanez 690. Seems I am most comfortable on a 1-5/8 neck width. I dont have a caliper to check the depth of the neck. I do take a large glove size minimum.. Maybe I should go for the 5er? I dont own one yet. And thank you Mark for the advice, much appreciated. WB
11 years ago
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#15663
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Hi, Compare how you're holding your hand to pictures on the net. Random web search yields this for example: http://www.adamnitti.com/bass_player_03.shtml (see fig 2). Note how the thumb stands out from the back of the neck and there's a gap in the palm of the hand so that it's not touching the neck, as opposed to a guitar grip as someone mentioned above, where you typically run your thumb along the neck. (Actually the bass grip is more similar to a classical guitar grip.) This example is perhaps more extreme than I would use, but it illustrates the point: http://www.pluckandplayguitar.com/guita ... ition.html So I guess, I suggest to make sure you're using a real bass grip firstly, since that's the one most recommended to avoid fretting hand problems. Especially when playing upright bass, they talk about a thumb pivot, so you need to have your thumb like that in order to span the large fretting positions of an upright.
11 years ago
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#16515
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Thanks to everyone that took time to give me a hand.. I have way to many basses and have no problem with pain. My favorites are 1-5/8. I think the neck is just to narrow for my fat hands. I am going to take Sheldons advice and am searching for an Afterburner 1, really prefer passive I have found. Seems like the 4 strings are pretty rare as I have yet to see one but I am goint to keep looking. 5 string is very tempting though......... Best Ken
11 years ago
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#16516
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Ken: Bass Northwest just got an ABI-4 in, in transparent black. See it here: http://www.bassnw.com/New%20Exotic%20%2 ... _Black.htm.
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