Thursday, 12 November 2009
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I'll be recording soon with my prima. We'll be recording straight to a PC with a DI box and then do re-amping in the studio, so that we don't waste much studio time. My question is, how should I have my bass onboard controls set? I usually like to push the low mids and bass just a touch. I was just thinking that maybe it's more preferred to have everything flat (or even in passive?) and do all eq in the studio, from my amp? I also always have the pickups in series, but I'd like to try other positions in parts of songs. That would mean much less output though and quite a different sound, could this be a problem? Of course we can adjust volume in the studio, I'm just thinking it miiiight sound "weird". I'll definitely discuss these things with our sound engineer, just wanted your opinion (and maybe Sheldon's) too.
12 years ago
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#14910
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Can't say I know much about recording, but I'll give my $0.02 Find out exactly what sound you want to use for which parts of what songs. Use those settings to record. As long as the sound is pretty close, you should be able to zero in later in the studio, but closer is better. If the sound isn't what your going for, you might have to change the settings. Take what I say with a grain of salt . . . what do other people say?
12 years ago
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#14911
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I prefer (on my ABII-5, BluEQube, FD-3s, OBP-1) parallel, bass 50% boosted, treble 35-45% boosted. Direct to the sound board. Never really strayed far from those settings. Series sound very hot to me. I do like bridge pickup solo'd for certain stuff however.
12 years ago
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#14916
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It's important to know what your natural bass signal sounds like. If you know what your putting-out(even if your not hearing it back)then you can really relax and dedicate maximum effort toward making music. Generally a conservative eq setting on the bass is a safe bet, don't roll the highs too far back, it's easy to roll them off later but difficult to add them in if they're not "down on tape". As long as you get your parts recorded cleanly with a bit of headroom the magic will be there. That's my $.02.
12 years ago
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#14918
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You're planning on changing settings on your bass while recording the track? If so, I would practice doing so without missing a beat/note tp see if you can pull it off consistently before hitting the studio. I'm a big fan of keeping things simple. I tend to leave the tone controls alone and use technique to acheive different sounds. I haven't recorded with either of my Dingwalls yet, but am looking forward to playing my Super P/J on our next CD.
12 years ago
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#14919
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I'd record the whole track with one pickup setting, then re-record the parts you want to try with a different pickup setting on a new track so you can A/B them.
12 years ago
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#14920
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[quote="Spiritbass":pgs97sn3]You're planning on changing settings on your bass while recording the track? If so, I would practice doing so without missing a beat/note tp see if you can pull it off consistently before hitting the studio. I'm a big fan of keeping things simple.[/quote:pgs97sn3] We'll record on a pc, not tape, so it's easy to stop and start recording with a different setting. Sheldon, thanks, that's what I was thinking, have everything in series in any case for consistensy and have two versions for the different settings parts, so that I can choose which works better in the studio. Thanks to all for your replies!
12 years ago
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#14922
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I generally aim for minimal EQ. Get as close as possible, keeping in mind that (as mentioned above) it's easier to remove than to add. Basically, get an idea of the tone that sits well in your recorded mix, and get as close To that as possible. You have a Dingwall, minimal EQ is required :)
11 years ago
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#15249
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Hi, I have gotten a great bass sound plugging direct into a Universal Audio 2108 pre, and on another track, recording the cabinet output with a condenser mic (Neumann U89). Both then go through an 1176. Make sure polarity is the same in your daw for the two tracks!! The sound is usually totally different between the two and, after time aligning the miked track with the DI'd track you can use the faders to greatly affect the sound without adding EQ. You can also leave the faders equal and start pushing the miked track later in time in 1 sample steps and you will notice how digital eq's work, with the sample offset affecting the frequency, and the volume of one of the tracks giving you control over the effect. Re-amping usually requires an impedance matching device so your bass amp sees the input load the same as your bass, which is totally different, and sounds different, than a line level output. And in my years of recording professionally it takes more studio time, not less, to re-amp. One caveat being that some times due to space limitations its not a good thing to have a bass amp leaking into everything when laying beds! Have Fun!
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