Friday, 14 October 2011
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I've started saving for a Dingwall. I don't need one, can't afford one, don't deserve one, but Man!! Are they freakin' sexy !!! No dealers in my area so I would be buying sight unseen. And more importantly no physical interaction. So a few stupid questions. 1. I have a 4 string right now. I like to rest my thumb on the neck pick up. If I go with a fiver will the B string become my new resting spot? I guess I'm not looking for an answer but what others have found when switching. 2. I have a Peavey practice amp. How well will the Dingwall tone come thru? And will the B be as impressive as everyone says? I guess this is my biggest concern. Don't have the money, need or space for a cab. 3. Anyone buy a Dingwall 4 string and hate yourself for not getting a 5? Thanks for any help.
10 years ago
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#21938
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I was were you are now about a year and a half ago, no dealer in the country never mind area, i bought my combustion sight unseen and have no regrets, i rest my thumb on the neck pickup with no problems, the fan frets are a breeze to get on with, but i see you dont play 5 string but if your thinking of starting then no better bass to start on, as for the amp i have never used one so cant comment on that, hope this helps but I'm sure some of the more experienced members will be able to give you more advice in regards to amp & sound, and welcome to the forum.
10 years ago
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#21940
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I started out playing 4-string as well. If the new Dingwall is your only bass and you're playing a song that only needs 4-strings, then yes, you'll likely keep your thumb on the B, but otherwise you'll be on the pickup. I used my Peavey practice amp with my Dingwall for quite a while before going to Markbass. The tone through the Peavey is fine, especially in smaller practice spaces. I used a Peavey MAX 112. I used a Markbass at church and the Peavey at home before finally getting a Markbass 112P Combo to use at home. Bought it mainly to have consistent tone/controls between church and at home and so I'd have a backup. Also like the VLE/VLF, though this can be purchased in their SuperBooster pedal (which I'd initially done). I started with a ABII-5, but eventually also bought a Super J-4. I use them both depending on the song but always went for 5 first just because I like having those extra notes.
10 years ago
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#21941
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Hey, welcome to the forums :) I bought my first Dingwall used, sight unseen, without ever seeing (or of course, playing) a fanned fret before, internationally, and without being able to check it out for a couple of months after the purchase. And fretless at that. Verdict, I couldn't have made a better choice. I love that bass so much. 1) I rest my thumb on the neck pickup. The fact that the pickup is "crooked" doesn't change how I feel when I play. On my [url=http://www.dingwallguitars.com/community/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=1948:2fqxishh]other Dingwall[/url:2fqxishh], which doesn't have a neck pickup in the normal sense, I manage just fine by using the B string, occasionally using the "neck" pickup or the fingerboard as a thumb rest, depending on the sound I want. Don't worry about all that. 2) What most people don't get is that the Dingwall B string is not "massive". I was expecting that on a Dingwall and was very surprised when I tried mine, slightly turned down. But on the first rehersal, I figured it out: being massive is not the point of a B string, and people who want that are welcome to use concrete armature wire instead of a B string. On that first rehersal, I got a compliment from bandmates that they can [i:2fqxishh]clearly hear[/i:2fqxishh] my low-register bassline, clearly distinguish each tone and pitch for each note I play. The Dingwall B string sounds like the other strings. It's not deeper or more massive. Therefore, you will be able to actually hear the B string with a clear pitch through your small amp. You'll also see that, by having a clear B string, you would be able to throw in a low D or C into a four string bassline and while that would just sound wrong on an other bass - here, will can work out. So the point of fanned fret is not having 4+1 strings where you have to adapt your technique or sound depending on the register you're playing on. Instead, you have one 5 string instrument that behaves as [i:2fqxishh]an instrument should[/i:2fqxishh]. And, when/if you want to shake the ground you can boost bass on your EQ and your E string will get the same treatment - which is great. 3) Most Dingwall players have at least one 5 string in their arsenal, and most have only 5+ strings. The consensus is that, on a 4 string, fanned fret doesn't improve too much. A 4 string Dingwall is a great boutique bass and the sound is much more even, but I can understand people owning non-Dingwall 4 stringers in addition to their 4 string Dingwall. On 5 strings, fanned fret just delivers, and the benefits are even greater on a 6 string. I wouldn't even consider owning a 6 string that is not fanned fret. But you should know that Dingwall is not just about fanned frets. It's a boutique brand, and the basses themselves are much more then the fret layout. My fretless is an extraordinary bass, with fanned fret being just the tip of the iceberg, what you notice first. The wood is amazing, the electronics is amazing, it's extremely comfortable, light, balances perfectly, the build is superb, so versatile you have to play it to believe it.. And they get improved all the time. All those things together make a Dingwall, not just fanned frets.
10 years ago
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#21942
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One thing I noticed when switching to 5-string (long before becoming a Dingwall owner) is that the B-string will ring if you don't mute it somehow. That's when I started using the B and E strings as my thumb rests (when I use the E-string, I also mute the B with the side of my thumb). Whatever bass you're playing through your Peavey practice amp - the Dinwgall will likely sound better. When you are ready to upgrade (and have the funds), it will only be that much better.
10 years ago
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#21943
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Thanks all for your replies. Hopefully one day I will be able to post pics of my Dingwall. Why does that sound perverted?
10 years ago
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#21945
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If you were already accustomed to playing 5-string, I would say you will have no problem at all adjusting to a 5-string Dingwall. But coming from a 4-string, the change could have some difficulties that you might blame on the fanned frets or the Dingwall brand. I played 4-string for most of my life and only got my first 5-string (a Fender Jazz Deluxe) a few months before I bought a Dingwall Afterburner II. Actually it was the Fender's flabby B that caused me to search for and eventually discover Dingwall basses. (BTW: 5-string Fenders have improved since then but still don't come near a Dingwall.) My biggest problem on both basses was muting the B and E strings. Eventually, I got in the habit of the "floating thumb mute". That's when you rest your thumb on the low string closest to the strings being played at the moment. If I'm playing the higher strings, my thumb rests on the E and mutes both the B & E. My left hand technique also changed. Before I was strictly using classical guitar technique with my fingers curved in a C shape and always fretting with the finger tips. Now my fingers are often flattened out to mute the high strings and to comfortably reach the B-string. This is especially useful for droning bass lines that don't have much movement, otherwise I switch back to classical technique. In spite of all that, I say go for a 5-string Dingwall to get the most benefit from the fanned frets. I bought a 4-string Super J before the SJ5 came out. I love it but I wish I had waited for the SJ5. The ABII-5 made me a 5-string player and now my SJ4 doesn't get the attention it deserves. Another benefit of having 5 strings is that you have more options on how to play any given bass line even if you don't go below E. Using the B-string around the 7th fret is very comfortable and you have quicker access to higher notes as well.
10 years ago
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#21959
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I bought an ABZ-4string. I will never get a 5 because I have no need/no desire to play those low notes. I also bought by bass sight unseen, and I even live in the same city where the basses are built! The dealer at the time only ever had Super J's in stock when I went in, so I got to mess around but I knew I didn't want the SJ. Your question about regretting not buying the 5 string; I never regret the decision, as my theory is if you can go to the lower note, play the same note on the next octave, it will stand out more. But then again, I like punk rock where the bassist is always running scales up nice and high to cut through. So that changes alot.
10 years ago
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#21963
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I had only ever seen pictures of the Dingwall basses before buying mine last week. No one I knew actually had one that I could try, but I'd heard some really good things about them on another forum I belong to. Long story short, I'm close enough to Bass Central to be able to walk in and spend an afternoon trying them out. I played a Lee Sklar 5, a Combustion 5, an Afterburner Z4 and an Afterburner Z5. Although my original intent was just to try them out to see what all the hype was about, after playing them, I was hooked. When I walked out the door that afternoon, it was as the proud owner of an Afterburner Z5 - which is coincidentally the only 5 I've ever touched that actually fits my fingers. It was desire at first look and love at first touch for me where Dingwall basses are concerned. I'm already deciding which one I'm going to buy next.
10 years ago
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#21965
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Congratulations!
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