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I haven't played fretless in probably a month or two, so I pulled it out to rehearse a couple very familiar songs we're playing on Sunday. It was a little flat, so I got it tuned up. The G string made a 'ping' sound right before getting to pitch. After playing through both songs a couple times, I went to a third song and was going through it when I felt and heard the neck go <chink!>. :shock: It startled me. I checked tuning after that and the E and A were just ever so slightly down, but the other 3 were ok. A quick visual inspection of the neck didn't show anything, though I didn't think it would as it even sounded like the truss rod.

I know my humidity levels in the house are down quite a bit due to the extreme cold we've had lately, but the tuning wasn't that far off. I'll definitely keep an eye on it.

Anything I should watch out for or does this happen from time to time? I'm thinking of investing in something to get it better controlled.
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In extreme weather conditions, you should always bring your instrument up to a satisfactory room temperature, ideally 22 Celsius or 71 Fahrenheit before tuning, stretch the strings at mid neck and tune again, repeat that a couple of time in between playing the bass a few minutes all over the neck. Wood will settle and strings will have reached their tensile elasticity back again and you're good to go.
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It's been in the house the whole time, so it isn't a matter of going from cold to warm, but it's been down to -10F outside (-50F with wind chill), so the humidity has gone down.
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In that case not having the bass on my bench I can't tell you precisely what it is, that was creeking during tuning. Also not sure how old your bass is, but just as a matter of precaution, check that the neck joint is tight and see if the screws worked themselves slightly loose, this can happen when wood dries up after a couple of years or earlier depending on the climate.

Check also that your machine heads are tight and not loose. Who knows it could be a number of things, none of which I'd worry about knowing the craftmanship that goes behind a Dingwall bass, but to be on the safe side check all screws and joints for taughtness, and last but not least give the truss rod a quarter turn first to the left and then back to the right just in case it's sticking inside.

good luck
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Sounds like the string hung on the nut or the saddle for a second. it will make a ping or high click
with all the freakin cold lately the nuts probably contracted a bit.
a REALLY COMMON thing with acoustic guitars since the wrap on the strings is finer,(and the nut and saddle slots are smaller) less common with basses but they will do the""ping thing"

this can come on with a string change or sometimes its and indication of a worn nut slot(they dont last forever) if it keeps doin it loosen the string and dribble some powered graphite in the slot(or used a #2 lead pencil) if that doesnt help
you can gently pull some mitchell abrasive cord thru to smooth the slot up

i would not sweat it to much tho :wink:
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I had this happen on a non-slanty fret bass last week. I don't think there was any adverse effects.
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[quote="Basso Profundo":34vabpyv]Sounds like the string hung on the nut or the saddle for a second. it will make a ping or high click
with all the freakin cold lately the nuts probably contracted a bit.
a REALLY COMMON thing with acoustic guitars since the wrap on the strings is finer,(and the nut and saddle slots are smaller) less common with basses but they will do the""ping thing"

this can come on with a string change or sometimes its and indication of a worn nut slot(they dont last forever) if it keeps doin it loosen the string and dribble some powered graphite in the slot(or used a #2 lead pencil) if that doesnt help
you can gently pull some mitchell abrasive cord thru to smooth the slot up

i would not sweat it to much tho :wink:[/quote:34vabpyv]

Thanks for the tip! I was not aware of the Mitchell abrasive cord - cool product. I think I have a slightly tight nut slot on one of mine. I have not experienced any pinging, but I can tell while tuning that the string isn't moving with slight adjustments of the tuner.
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[quote:1h9lwp4n]Thanks for the tip! I was not aware of the Mitchell abrasive cord - cool product. I think I have a slightly tight nut slot on one of mine. I have not experienced any pinging, but I can tell while tuning that the string isn't moving with slight adjustments of the tuner.[/quote:1h9lwp4n]

anytime!

have also seen Strings develop an notch/flatspot where its been sitting on the bridge, altho looking a Sheldons bridges seems unlikely(maybe on the combustion as it has more of a notch), but that will cause the same sorta ping or "Boing" as it gets pulled over the notch snags and finally lets go.
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Living in Alberta, from years of dingwall use, if the humidity was greatly changed/reduced, even though its in the same house, it can be enough to effect the bass. But you should find that the neck has moved from where you left it last time (even with a maple neck and fb, when the humidity drops dramatically, the neck flattens out in my experence, but if you don't have really low action, you may not notice the change...the same is more pronounced on my maple neck wenge fb basses)

I can say the dingwalls move less than any other bass i own, and the maple maple combo rivals my graphite neck basses for stability

way to go Sheldon

so if the neck seemed greatly different from a playability stand point, it could be just settling in with the major change...(and that could add reason for many of the possible causes for the ping...)
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