1. silaslow
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  3. Sunday, 18 December 2016
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Hey Sheldon,

Payson just released a gauge of string .145 meant for tuning to drop A. I am considering trying this out but going up to standard B for the added tension. I remember reading somewhere that Dingwall bass necks were 'optimized' for 35lbs tension. What do you mean by that? I am guessing that each string in your string sets is fine tuned to average at 35lbs when tuned to standard pitch. Making an even amount of tension on both high and low pitched strings, allowing for the single trussrod to maintain the same curve on both the thick and thin string sides of the neck. And that thus negates the need for 2 trussrods commonly found on some other basses which is trying to cope with uneven string to string tension (due to unbalanced tension/gauge possibilities)

So, i am assuming the .145 would definitely put on more tension than that being tuned at B. Would that be a problem? Any chance of that causing too much tension and warping the neck in the long run or something?

I am bearing in mind also that a .145 set would also mean a slight increase in gauges overall for all other strings which also adds even more tension overall. Last i spoke to Payson, these were the gauges for a .145 set: .145 .105 .85 .65 .45 .35

Also, what are the gauges for your nickel 6 string sets? I remember reading that the gauges printed on the string packs were not necessarily accurate due to an 'over-printing' of the previous design string packaging?

Sorry for the long 'essay'. Just my musings. Thanks for your time. Really appreciate it :0
Silas
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35 lbs to 40 lbs would be more accurate.

I can't comment on the Payson strings as we've not tried them. More tension is more tension no matter who makes the string. So as a loose rule of thumb, I'd say that if the heavier strings require anymore than 1/4 turn of extra truss-rod tightening, you're probably shortening the life of your neck.

I wouldn't worry about twist as every parallel fret neck ever made has been subjected to un-balanced string tension and there doesn't seem to be a twisting problem outside of the odd neck with bad wood.

Don't get too hung up on gauges. They are a measure of diameter, not tension. They suggest a certain "window" of tension but within that window there can be a difference of up to 5 lbs.
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Thanks for the quick and elaborate response :)

... Though i am curious about what you mean by "shortening the life of the neck"? My guess is, under too much strain it could eventually snap?
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Stripped truss rod nut, broken truss rod weld, split on back of the neck from too much truss rod pressure, cold flow kink at the heel. There are all kinds of ways stress shows up on a neck.
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Ouch... I see... :0

Thanks for the responses... I will keep that in mind :0
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