Wednesday, 12 August 2015
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Miss my neck through Warwick. Is there a Dingwall model that's neck through?
6 years ago
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#28528
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the only Fanned fret bass I've every seen with a neck through is the Brice Defiant. I could be wrong though. I bought one just because I wanted a neck through FF bass, but then I modded it with new pickups and redid the finish because I thought it was UGLY. It's nice, (made in S Korea by the way) [url=http://s149.photobucket.com/user/markfinley/media/basses/before%20and%20after.jpg.html:1ttp7ryw][img:1ttp7ryw]http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s67/markfinley/basses/before%20and%20after.jpg[/img:1ttp7ryw][/url:1ttp7ryw] [url=http://s149.photobucket.com/user/markfinley/media/basses/DSC_0614.jpg.html:1ttp7ryw][img:1ttp7ryw]http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s67/markfinley/basses/DSC_0614.jpg[/img:1ttp7ryw][/url:1ttp7ryw]
6 years ago
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#28532
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[quote="jon87uk":2c0ga3el]Miss my neck through Warwick. Is there a Dingwall model that's neck through?[/quote:2c0ga3el] SD himself has stated he much prefers bolt-on because if something goes wrong with the neck, it can be easily replaced.
6 years ago
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#28808
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Jon87uk, what did you like about the neck through Warwick? What are you missing? (Looking to understand not challenge here)
6 years ago
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#28809
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I have made a list over all basses I've ever owned through the years. One out of six has been neck-thru; all of them has been sold or traded, all in all eight pieces. All others were bolt-on, or in case of acoustic basses set-necks, but not too many. Have you done your maths homework you know how many there were all in all. Still got eight basses left, but two are out for sale: one neck-thru and one set-neck. I think Mr Dingwall has nailed it; at least according to MY statitics... :wink: :wink: :wink:
6 years ago
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#28810
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x = total number of basses n = number of neck through b = number of bolt on neck or others x = n + b (neck throughs plus others) b = 5n (since 1 in 6 is neck through, ie, 1 for every 5 others) n = 8 (mentioned in your post) b = 5(8) b = 40 x = (8) + (40) x = 48 There were 48 basses in total. I think what Sheldon is asking is what a neck-through bass can do for you that a bolt-on neck bass can't. I played a cheap Ibanez neck through once and it was interesting, but I didn't like the finish on the neck: it was the same high gloss as the body so my hand didn't slide very well. The bass was very thin though. Since I started playing my MTD Kingston again, I've found that the neck pocket (at least the guitar back under the pocket) digs into my ample stomach, while my ABII didn't so the Dingwall bolt on neck doesn't bother me. I personally think if you compare a neck-through to a bolt-on (pros and cons of each) the bolt on comes out on top, but that's my opinion. What are your thoughts?
6 years ago
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#28811
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I have only ever owned one neck through (it was an early first model Warwick, which was like a Steinberger, but with wood) and I find that I just prefer the feel of a bolt-on. I have read that neck-through basses have better sustain, but I have never felt that bolt-ons have lacked in that regard for what I use them for, so it has never been an issue. I also like the idea that if something goes wrong with the neck, that it can be replaced without having to replace the whole bass.
6 years ago
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#28812
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[quote="Smallmouth_Bass":qre5ojaf]I have only ever owned one neck through (it was an early first model Warwick, which was like a Steinberger, but with wood) [/quote:qre5ojaf] Nobby Meidel? Interesting basses, those. I am convinced that as soon as you're looking at quality basses there's no real difference in attack, sustain, tone regardless of neck-through, bolt-on or set. I have a Warwick Thumb 4 (NT), Sandberg Classic S2 (NT), and Ding Z2 (BO). All instruments of a quality far exceeding my bass-playing qualities. I'm happy with all of them but currently playing only the Z2 (and occasionally my first build which is a BO as well). Of course if something goes wrong with the neck it's easy to which one is the better approach. Then again, I would like to think that a good instrument will not display any issues (famous last words, maybe?) so it's really down to the company or luthier making the instrument to use the method they feel most comfortable with. For me as a player it really doesn't matter. Much or at all. Regards, Michael
6 years ago
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#28813
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Yes, it was a Nobby Meidel. The neck was as straight as an arrow and I never adjusted it. It had the lowest action of any bass I have ever played, but it was an awkward shape for me and I never played it, so I finally sold it a little while back.
6 years ago
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#28814
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Fodera has some interesting sound clips available, where they parallel test three basses of the same model, but with one difference: set neck, neck thru and bolt on. Even if it was just clips from the web I found the bolt-on being the one I liked best... https://soundcloud.com/fodera-guitars
6 years ago
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#28817
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That is interesting. Sometimes the Dovetail or Neck through is a bit rounder, but overall the bolt on seems to provide more clarity, where the others can get a little muddy. Sometimes it doesn't seem deep enough, but I know on my Dingwall that is NOT an issue. Still curious to see what Jon87uk says. I had heard it was mainly about sustain as well. EDIT: I had accidentally typed "sometime it does seem deep enough"
6 years ago
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#28819
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I would logically assume that when a note is 'plucked', that, by virtue of the vibrating string, other waves would establish themselves in different aspects .... the physical makeup of the instrument, for example - the bolt/thru debate. I also logically assume that that physical wave / vibration going thru a thru body instrument would (don't know how to describe here) just reflect up and down the neck length. I guess it would increase perceived sustain, but it's, I don't know, "locked" in the neck. It's a ocean wave crashing on a break-wall - the energy turns them back and they hit into incoming waves, cresting with the opposing energy. Bolt-ons (again, logically assuming) vibrate too, but the connection diminishes at the coupling to the neck, which would leave a lot of resonance for the body itself to bring forth. They neck will still carry waves but that is in virtue of the string contact, fretted or open. I mean, my Dingray sustains, well ....for a LONG time.... and, importantly, sounds right ( I HAVE had Alembic and Carvin Bunny Brunell. Just didn't quite sound right
6 years ago
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#28823
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BassAce, I think I understand what you're trying to say, but keep in mind that a glued joint (ie, the joint between the wings and the neck in a neck thru) is simply sitting there, while a bolted joint is under tremendous compression which I heard (and believe) better transmits these waves you're talking about. A bolted connection is much more solid than a glued connection (although I don't mean to say that it's always stronger). Smarter people than I can confirm/refute this.
5 years ago
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#28989
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Sheldon, Sorry didn't mean ignore your reply, had a break from internet forums due to some other projects. The Warwick I miss most was the P-Nut II. I think it was the growl that bass could get which I think was a combination of the woods and pick ups. I have to admit that my NG2 is right up there with the sustain and probably only weighs about 2/3 of the Warwick which is greatly appreciated. Never got to play the basses back to back as one released funds for the other (plus some spare change). My main question was has it been tried? Not trying to play devils advocate. More of general interest.
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