1. Smallmouth_Bass
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  3. Saturday, 18 November 2006
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I was discussing the subject of maple with a guitarist friend of mine and he was telling me that maple near the root (bottom) of a tree is more "solid" than the wood further up.

Have you guys ever heard of this and is maple selection (for necks) chosen with this in mind?
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Brim Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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I think it depends more in how you cut the wood, quarter-sawn vs. flat-sawn, quarter-sawn being stronger b/c it resists bending perpendicular to the grain. Flat sawn you get more cuts out of the log, but the strength is less due to the rings being wider and more suspectible to bending (I think it's called cupping).
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aqsw Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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Just wondering why a maple neck is a premium. Is it just looks , or is it more stable. This is basd on an SJ4.
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Sheldon Dingwall Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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It looks like I missed answering this thread originally.

To the OP: I haven't heard that particular theory. It's pretty hard to spec maple unless you live near the saw mill.

Middle post: Flatsawn is stiffest in one direction and weakest in the other. Like a tape measure. Quartersawn is equally stiff in either direction but only about 75% as stiff as the stiffest flatsawn direction.

Last post: maple necks are our default neck so no upcharge. Maple fingerboards have an upcharge because they require more steps to finish and do fretwork. They're pretty fussy to work on actually.
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