Monday, 12 November 2007
  0 Replies
  1.9K Visits
0
Votes
Undo
  Subscribe
Just wondering.....
13 years ago
·
#9281
0
Votes
Undo
As far as playing chordal stuff higher in the neck, I have no problem up to 17th position. In the very extreme cases I want to go chordal above that, I have my 6string Dingwalls. IMO and IME, the Dingwalls are the most tonally balanced basses along the strings and across the strings, so instead of going higher than 17th position I reach out for my 6ers (having said that, my 6ers have not hit the gigging scene with me yet). Now that is sth new for me to do
13 years ago
·
#9278
0
Votes
Undo
[quote="Brim":1hsk8tu5][quote="JEDI BASS TRICKS":1hsk8tu5]So, I play my parrallel fret bass for these songs. Plus, I love variety...it's the spice of life, right?[/quote:1hsk8tu5] Well...at least you're playing your Lakland right? Hehe. Good man.[/quote:1hsk8tu5] YEP!! It's unparrallelled :wink: amongst the NON-Dingwalls IMO. :D
13 years ago
·
#9277
0
Votes
Undo
[quote="JEDI BASS TRICKS":lyg3qdkp]So, I play my parrallel fret bass for these songs. Plus, I love variety...it's the spice of life, right?[/quote:lyg3qdkp] Well...at least you're playing your Lakland right? Hehe. Good man.
13 years ago
·
#9272
0
Votes
Undo
There's several songs that we've (our band THIRD OBSESSION) written lately that have some fast licks played 1st thru 5th frets, B, E, and A strings, licks that repeat, a lot! The stretching is extreme, even with my big hands. My left hand cramps badly during these songs, if I use my Dingwalls. Also, there's a song that I hold a note and it's octave at the same time and slide up and down to the next note/octave, not easy with the frets changing angles on me mid-slide. So, I play my parrallel fret bass for these songs. Plus, I love variety...it's the spice of life, right?
13 years ago
·
#9270
0
Votes
Undo
Don't own one.
13 years ago
·
#8937
0
Votes
Undo
.. thats not the only "alternative"..;-) i play "fretless" instruments daily... for example my double-bass and my upright....:-) using my old parallel-fretted Esh-Bass, built by the very, very artful german bass-builder Christof Kost, makes also al lot of fun :-)
13 years ago
·
#8927
0
Votes
Undo
All I need to say is I'm in the process of selling two parallel-fret basses out of five basses I currently own, the other 3 being a fretless acoustic, a 5-string fretted acoustic and my new ABII :lol: So if Commander D. ever produces a Dingwall acoustic...guess what'd happen next... 8)
13 years ago
·
#8925
0
Votes
Undo
I still play parallel, mainly Fenders. I still like the wider string spacing of Precisions and even most Jazz Basses. I also miss the slight arch on most Fender fret boards. Sometimes I enjoy playing on the Fender necks and enjoy the mellow sounds so much that I start thinking, "Why did I spend all that money on the Dingwalls?" Then, I go back to one of my Dingwalls and it hits me every time. Oh right, THAT SOUND! It just jumps off the fret board and it is so clear and tight and BIG. With the Dingwalls, there are no volume wars with the guitarist and the drummer
13 years ago
·
#8924
0
Votes
Undo
Theres a few of us w/ Fretless afterburners already. Playing fanned fretless is no different than playing fanned fretted . If your solid w/ fretless parallel, you'll have little issue w/ fanned fretless (or multiscale fretless) IF you do a search in the basses forum you'll find a thread from funkshey on his ABII fretless and my comments are in there. I've had a fanned fretless ABI since 03
13 years ago
·
#8923
0
Votes
Undo
Hi bigmanonbass. I think several of us forum talkers are waiting for the new (more affordable) AB line to come out so we can do fretless conversions (or maybe Sheldon will offer it in fretless). I already have an appointment with HG Thor for a fretboard coating. If fate will allow, I may just send a Dingwall to Thor instead of my Yamaha. Also, I just bought (today in fact) an AB-I 6er off Talkbass. So, I could possibly send my 5 string AB-I, but that would hurt...I love it & don't play fretless much. Sorry for rambling on.... I'm buzzing from anticipation!! Can't wait for my bass to get here!!! :D
13 years ago
·
#8922
0
Votes
Undo
I know it's been a while since anyone has replied to this thread and this is just a bit off the topic since the parallel bass I still do play is fretless, but there it is. I play the fretless a lot...mostly because I don't have a fretless Dingwall (and if anyone out there would like to comment on what it's like playing a fretless Dingwall, I would sure like to know). I don't play my fretted basses anymore. My ABI is all the bass I need for that. Thank you Sheldon for giving me the one bass I need. Greg
14 years ago
·
#8041
0
Votes
Undo
[quote="nastyn8c":ljo9rgtd][quote="lomo":ljo9rgtd][quote="JEDI BASS TRICKS] It's easier to play many of my chordal compositions that are played above the 12th fret, on a parallel fret bass. [/quote] +1[/quote] Honestly, I've found it merely to be different. You can get creative with the fanned frets and use chords you wouldn't normally use, especially stuff that's utilizes same fret, different string.[/quote][/quote:ljo9rgtd][/quote:ljo9rgtd] Valid point! It hadn't crossed my mind to consider rethinking how I fret the chords, DUH :roll: ! Another thing that came to mind after reading your comment, chords (above the 12th fret or so) that required impossible stretches should be much easier on the Dingwall. I think I'll get off the 'puter and go make up a new piece using these ideas! Thanks!!
14 years ago
·
#8040
0
Votes
Undo
[quote="lomo":305wijj6][quote="JEDI BASS TRICKS] It's easier to play many of my chordal compositions that are played above the 12th fret, on a parallel fret bass. [/quote] +1[/quote][/quote:305wijj6] Honestly, I've found it merely to be different. You can get creative with the fanned frets and use chords you wouldn't normally use, especially stuff that's utilizes same fret, different string.
14 years ago
·
#8013
0
Votes
Undo
[quote="JEDI BASS TRICKS It's easier to play many of my chordal compositions that are played above the 12th fret, on a parallel fret bass. [/quote] +1
14 years ago
·
#8012
0
Votes
Undo
[quote="JEDI BASS TRICKS":2pa3zsp2]Well, a little less than a year ago I agreed to meet a guy to buy his Lakland 5594 (5 string). It didn't sell on ebay, so I was gonna get it for $1700 w/ tweed case (a very fair price). I had never played a Lakland, but I knew they had 35" B strings (a must for any 5 str) and this bass was striking: birdseye maple fretboard, quilt maple tobacco burst top, banjo frets (like Dingwalls), Bartolini pups and elec, and the quality and reputation that all bassists have heard of if you don't live under a rock. I drove 6 hours round trip for it, got to see The Red Hot Chili Peppers in Nashville that night too! Was almost wanting to skip the concert to play the bass at the hotel.....almost! Flea was calling too, you know! Needless to say, the bass is phenomenal. The sound, a product of all the best elements that went into the basses construction, is the voice I had been searching for since picking up my first bass 21 years ago at the age of 16. BUT, NOW I HAVE A DINGWALL ABI 5er, it has the same SWEET voice that my Lakland has, with a bit more growl & bite and (as we all know) a B string that is unmatched PERIOD! The craftmenship, attention to detail, etc is as good, and we all know how good Dingwall's customer service is via this forum! So, will I quit playing my Lakland.....NEVER! It's easier to play many of my chordal compositions that are played above the 12th fret, on a parallel fret bass. IMO, there's no real tone compromise on the A, D, and G strings of a quality parallel fret bass compared to a Dingwall. I actually prefer the tone and tension of even shorter D and G strings, like Rickenbackers 33.5" scale or even shorter scale Gibsons or Hofners. And, if I don't need the Dinger's B string and don't feel like stretching in the lower register, out comes my Lakland. DON'T GET ME WRONG, MY DINGWALL IS MY FAVORITE BASS AND THE ONE MY BAND PREFERS TOO! But, there's no reason to snub other basses, they have their strengths too. Be bilingual....have more than one bass voice! You know, if it weren't impossible to play, I'd like to have a fanned fret bass with a 37" B and a 31" G.....talk about impossible to play! The fanning would be EXTREME! But, the D and G would be sooo sweet![/quote:2pa3zsp2] I just checked out the spec sheet for the Super J for the first time. Sounds like Sheldon agrees that shorter D and G strings sound sweeter. He's the Man!! How about making a 35.5 to 32.5 scale 5 or 6 string......I'd be buying one!!
14 years ago
·
#8009
0
Votes
Undo
Well, a little less than a year ago I agreed to meet a guy to buy his Lakland 5594 (5 string). It didn't sell on ebay, so I was gonna get it for $1700 w/ tweed case (a very fair price). I had never played a Lakland, but I knew they had 35" B strings (a must for any 5 str) and this bass was striking: birdseye maple fretboard, quilt maple tobacco burst top, banjo frets (like Dingwalls), Bartolini pups and elec, and the quality and reputation that all bassists have heard of if you don't live under a rock. I drove 6 hours round trip for it, got to see The Red Hot Chili Peppers in Nashville that night too! Was almost wanting to skip the concert to play the bass at the hotel.....almost! Flea was calling too, you know! Needless to say, the bass is phenomenal. The sound, a product of all the best elements that went into the basses construction, is the voice I had been searching for since picking up my first bass 21 years ago at the age of 16. BUT, NOW I HAVE A DINGWALL ABI 5er, it has the same SWEET voice that my Lakland has, with a bit more growl & bite and (as we all know) a B string that is unmatched PERIOD! The craftmenship, attention to detail, etc is as good, and we all know how good Dingwall's customer service is via this forum! So, will I quit playing my Lakland.....NEVER! It's easier to play many of my chordal compositions that are played above the 12th fret, on a parallel fret bass. IMO, there's no real tone compromise on the A, D, and G strings of a quality parallel fret bass compared to a Dingwall. I actually prefer the tone and tension of even shorter D and G strings, like Rickenbackers 33.5" scale or even shorter scale Gibsons or Hofners. And, if I don't need the Dinger's B string and don't feel like stretching in the lower register, out comes my Lakland. DON'T GET ME WRONG, MY DINGWALL IS MY FAVORITE BASS AND THE ONE MY BAND PREFERS TOO! But, there's no reason to snub other basses, they have their strengths too. Be bilingual....have more than one bass voice! You know, if it weren't impossible to play, I'd like to have a fanned fret bass with a 37" B and a 31" G.....talk about impossible to play! The fanning would be EXTREME! But, the D and G would be sooo sweet!
14 years ago
·
#7884
0
Votes
Undo
Aside from a week or so of shop/retrofit time, I've played my other basses on average 5 times a year over the last 10+ years, and probably about 25% of the time the first few years I owned my Dingwall. There are things I really like about other basses but they are completely overruled. Aside from just the fanned fretting there are many other traits that factor into the equation, versatility being the most important of those traits for me. BTY, Sheldon's basses wear quite gracefully so don't be afraid to rack-up some mojo on your Dingwall!!
14 years ago
·
#7869
0
Votes
Undo
Lol, last night I grabbed my first bass, a cheap washburn... so, at some point while I was playing, I looked down and my initial spontaneous reaction was "WTF is wrong with those frets??"
14 years ago
·
#7866
0
Votes
Undo
I play my parallel fret guitars daily. Do those count? They're kinda like little basses... sorta... :P :D :wink:
14 years ago
·
#7858
0
Votes
Undo
about 50/50 between the dingy and the others. not much time to practice these days anyway :cry:
  • Page :
  • 1
  • 2
There are no replies made for this post yet.
Be one of the first to reply to this post!