1. TheHorse
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  3. Wednesday, 01 February 2012
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Hello everybody. As I stated in the title I am currently deciding which model will be my first Dingwall. I have tried a Combustion, an ABZ, an AB1, a Sklar and a SuperJ (yep, the shop I work in is has seen them all :D), and i was setting my mind on a 6 string ABZ.
But here comes Sheldon and his beautiful SuperP. And now I want it.
But i don't know which of the two would be better: i'm playing in a fusion-experimental-metal kind of band (www.myspace.com/observethemusic). Personally, i DIG the P tone. But would it sound right with this gig? or would the more modern ABZ do better?
Thanks for the help, i know it's an hard question, but hey any kind of input would be deeply appreciated.

Luca
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callum Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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First thing I think of is that there is a big price difference between a Combustion and some of the upper models, but I guess you already have considered that.

Secondly, call me a long scale snob, but I only consider the models with 37" B strings "real" Dingwalls, so that may be a consideration for you one way or the other.

You're lucky to have been able to try so many, so you know that they all sound fantastic and while each has a particular flavour they are all very versatile. Only you will be able to say for sure which one suits your sound, your "look" (if that matters in a gigging situation), and which feels most comfortable.

Good luck.

[edit: typo]
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  1. more than a month ago
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singlemalt Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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You can get a P tone pup for the five string AB's but not for the sixer (yet). I've got a AB-1 5 string with the P tone and Payson's ground wound flats. Works great. This one gets first pick just because it is so light. (maybe 8 lb) Retro thump out of the sleek modern look!

You can also purchase a split coil P style pick up and retro fit a Super J with a new pickguard. Like this:[img:140clsyj]http://img577.imageshack.us/img577/7372/superpj5postop.jpg[/img:140clsyj]

If it's to be a sixer there is no Super P, or P tone option. Don't let that put you off. All the AB's, ABZ, Z's and Prima's have the slightly tighter 18 mm string spacing.

If it's to be a five string, the big question is the long scale (AB's and such) over the more moderate scale of the Super P or PJ. A few less frets on the Super P's and J's as well, not quite the full two octave neck as on the AB's.

You should try and talk the shop into ordering a Super P :D

At this point, I understand that the new Super P uses the same neck as the Super J. Best of all worlds in my opinion, I never could get along with the traditional P neck, which is too chunky. I always liked the sexier J body with the offset curves and the slimmer J neck. The Super J is a funk monster, with a wider 19 mm string spacing at the bridge. I think the new Super P uses the same hipshot bridge.

And a mention for that great hipshot bridge, which makes changing strings a snap. With Payson's fanned fret string line up you can switch from stainless rounds, to nickel rounds, to nickel flats in minutes with no set up fiddling around. Once the strings are cut and fitted, you can swap sets easily.

All the necks have a very consistent feel, which makes jumping back and forth between the AB's and Super J's not that big of a deal. You notice the change for a few minutes, but it's not that big a deal. I'm still more comfortable on the SJ-5, which feels fast and wide open after playing the longer tighter, AB's.

The sound clips were great. With that in mind, I'd say the long scale, one of the models with a pre amp/passive option. Maybe a AB-2 sixer? Try it out first, the sixer is a big beast with long reaches to the nut and a wide fingerboard. It's not heavy or uncomfortable, by any means, but just a lot of bass. I've been working with my sixer more and more these days, but it's still not ready for prime time. The clear, articulate tone and chords are perfect for the big sound you guys had on the recordings.

For the look, the AB's are very sleek and modern, while the Super P and J trip people up by looking so traditional at first glance, then their heads start to rotate to one side as they notice the frets. With all the models the head rotation is followed by the open mouth when you start playing.

Be warned that the first Dingwall will send you on an amp and cab journey. My tip is lots of watts and fEarful cabs. Like this:[img:140clsyj]http://img341.imageshack.us/img341/2770/uhohc.jpg[/img:140clsyj]

Good luck!
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  1. more than a month ago
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TheHorse Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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Callum and singlemalt, thank you for the awesome feedback! Price might not be a problem, but I hear you on the scale: what made me fell in love with these basses was their perfect tension and long neck. I have found while playing the SuperJ that the neck feels more like a short scale than a regular scale. Nothing wrong with that since it helps keeping a straight J tone.
I wasn't considering string spacing, but that also is important for me: I love a wider spacing as much as a chunky, fat neck. I remember feeling comfortable enough with the ABZ, but the 19mm spacing really tickles me.
We have already placed an order for a superP, but it's due no sooner than April and possibly later. I don't wanna wait until then!
Damned D.A.S.!!!
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Mark L Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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If you're going, you should go long scale (ABZ-6) to appreciate the full benefit of fanned frets. My SJ is awesome, but I usually grab one of my 37 inchers first. Good luck on your quest. BTW, there's a beautiful AB1-6 that just shipped today.

viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2240
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DattaGroover Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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I almost went for a Combustion as my first Dingwall last fall. I went instead for an ABII and I am [b:2a4bosn1]so[/b:2a4bosn1] glad I did. I have played professionally since 1974, mostly 4-stringer who would occasionally play 5. This ABII has turned me into a 5-stringer. That 37-inch "B" just kills. I also have a Hipshot that goes down to an "A" on the low end with more articulation than most 5's have on their "B."

Ditto what the others say about the Super J & P.

I love it.
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DattaGroover Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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Having listened to your track, I absolutely think the ABZ will be more in line with your tone and music style, plus, you won't get those same unbelievable low notes from the P.

ALL the Dingwalls sound good, and play good (just some are good-er than others), but the ABZ is very different from the Super P or J.
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TheHorse Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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I would like to Thank everybody. Your help was immensely appreciated. Suffice to say I just placed my order for an ABZ: 6 strings, natural finish, maple FB. Now I just have to wait three months.
I don't think I can do it. I want it now!
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aqsw Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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Congrats, I think you made the right choice. I ordered an ABZ5 at the beginning of January and have a five month wait, and I'm in Canada!!!
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