1. JEDI BASS TRICKS
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  3. Thursday, 24 January 2008
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Anyone else tried a Fatfinger on their basses or guitars? They're made by Groove Tubes, and are a chunk of metal that clamps on your headstock to add mass and theoretically increase sustain and eliminate deadspots. Read more at www.groovetubes.com . I received 2 yesterday (a bigger/heavier 1 for bass & 1 for guitars). I took them to band practice. The guitarist heard a favorable difference and used it the whole time. I took a Strat and amp to work last night and another guitarist there noticed, as did I, that the sustain was markedly increased w/ the Fatfinger. On my AB-I 5 string bass, I noticed an increased punch on the lower notes, especially when slapping the open low B string. It actually felt like the B string was tighter, no joke :shock: ! Is that possible, the perfect B....improved? I don't know. But, the cost was an apparent loss of volume from the higher notes, especially around the 8th to 12th frets of the D and G strings. It was as though the pickups had been adjusted away from the G, and toward the B, causing an output inbalance :? . I was only able to experiment for a short time before practice was over, and I had to rush to work. I need to fiddle around some more before I'm sure that my initial observations are accurate, and get feedback from some listeners, too. But, so far both guitarists liked the fatfinger on a Schecter and a Fender Strat. Anybody else tried them?
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fullrangebass Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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I am not the world's leading expert in physics, but from my understanding, by changing the mass of the headstock, the amplitude of certain frequencies may be augmented to the expense of others.

I love the tonal balance of my Dingwalls and never I felt the desire to mess with a Fat Finger on a Dingwall. An additional point when using it, would be the possible "neck dive" effect
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FrankM Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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Like Fullie-- I'm no physics expert either, but from read along time ago, Billy Sheehan who uses these FATFINGERS on this basses, says he empirically tests where to place the fat finger along his heastock and it changes placement depending on the bass.
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FrankM Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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double post---sorry
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Sheldon Dingwall Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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I've experimented with adding mass to the headstock to try and cure a deadspot. It didn't cure it 100%, but it did mellow it out and move it up a half step.
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JEDI BASS TRICKS Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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I've had some physics and my career is in science, so I agree that it makes sense that mass affects the sound of stringed instruments. Most likely, the B feeling tighter was my mind playing tricks, since it SOUNDED like a tighter string....if that makes since. It had the punch and volume of a tighter string. Ultimately, I took it off...the loss of volume from the higher notes made it sound like I was dropping out in certain parts of the songs. The volume difference was that great! Of course some compression would fix that. And, I'll try that next :) . The drummer had rearranged the studio and added some sound dampening foam, since last practice. This could have affected my sound, too. So, after I rule out other variables and do more comparisons, I'll post my findings.
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